How Your Flip-Flops Reveal the Dark Side of Globalization

World Wide (Conversation) – As you pack for your holidays, don’t forget to pack your flip-flops – and treat them with respect, they may have travelled more than you and witnessed things you cannot see. Flip flops may look simple and cheap, but they are part of a bigger and more complicated story. Flip-flops are the world’s highest selling shoe – outselling even trainers. Uncounted billions of them are made every year, often in small factories in China. Flip-flop sales rise with world population. As one billion people globally still…

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Ugandan women say #HarassmentIsNotLove as cyber harassment ruling draws backlash

Ugandan (GV) – Ugandan member of parliament Sylvia Rwabwogo had just emerged from a months-long nightmare during which she received daily text messages and calls from a stranger, professing his love to her. When a magistrate court in Kampala, Uganda handed down a two-year prison sentence to 25-year-old Brian Isiko on charges of cyber harassment and offensive communication, the MP thought she could finally find some peace. But her torment continued when some Ugandan citizens lashed out against the ruling, saying it was “too harsh”. Local mainstream media minimized the seriousness of the case by…

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“The Revolution Will be Feminist, or it Will be Nothing”. Dirty Laundry to the Streets of Chile

Chile (OpenDemocracy) – The feminist movement at Chilean universities this 2018 originally emerged due to some cases of harassment by teachers students had reported in several national university schools. Firstly it was an isolated rumor, and then almost an open secret about teachers who were known for their bad practices with female students or who, using their position of power, tried to get some kind of sentimental and/or sexual approach with them. Then, several female students began to report such actions to the media. The scandal at the University of Chile’s School…

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Race of mass shooters influences how the media cover their crimes, new study shows

United States (Conversation) – On Jan. 24, 2014, police found Josh Boren, a 34-year-old man and former police officer, dead in his home next to the bodies of his wife and their three children. The shots were fired execution-style on Boren’s kneeling victims, before he turned the gun on himself. On Aug. 8, 2015, 48-year-old David Ray Conley shot and killed his son, former girlfriend and six other children and adults at his former girlfriend’s home. Like Boren, Conley executed the victims at point-blank range. Both men had histories of…

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Sex Education Lessons From Mississippi and Nigeria

World Wide (Conversation) – Nigeria and Mississippi are a world apart physically, but the rural American state and the African country have much in common when it comes to the obstacles they had to overcome to implement sex education in their schools. Three lessons about overcoming these obstacles come out of research that several colleagues and I conducted on how sex education came to be in Nigeria and Mississippi. The lessons are particularly relevant for similarly religious and conservative places where people often worry – as they do throughout the…

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Who Chooses Abortion? More Women Than You Might Think

United States (Conversation) – The abortion debate is at the center of U.S. political dialogue. As of June 2018, 49 percent of Americans consider themselves pro-choice, while 45 percent consider themselves pro-life. Voices from both sides flood social media feeds, while newspapers, radio and television programs frequently cover the topic. Since 2011, politicians have enacted 400 pieces of legislation restricting this medical procedure. One important group’s voice is often absent in this heated debate: the women who choose abortion. While 1 in 4 women will undergo abortion in her lifetime,…

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Nearly 60% of Young Children are Social Justice Activists – A Future Full of Elin Erssons

United Kingdom (Conversation) – Since 21-year-old Swedish student Elin Ersson live streamed her protest against the deportation of an Afghan asylum seeker, the video has been viewed more than 11m times on Facebook. The young woman refused to sit down until the man was removed, announcing to the camera and her fellow passengers: “I’m doing what I can to save a person’s life.” At one point in the video, a man with a British accent is heard telling Ersson: I don’t care what you think. What about all these children…

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Millennials Are So Over US Domination of World Affairs

United States (Conversation) – Millennials, the generation born between 1981 and 1996, see America’s role in the 21st century world in ways that, as a recently released study shows, are an intriguing mix of continuity and change compared to prior generations. For over 40 years the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, which conducted the study, has asked the American public whether the United States should “take an active part” or “stay out” of world affairs. This year, an average of all respondents – people born between 1928 and 1996 –…

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Survey: Americans Don’t Like The Government, But They Want More Of It

United States (Conversation) – A sizeable academic literature seeks to explain why the Americans have a smaller welfare state than similar Western countries, especially in Europe. One interesting observation this literature relies upon is that the US population believes in the meritocratic principles of the “American dream”. It is true that American opinions place more weight on hard work than luck, compared to Europeans, to explain people’s success in life, and that such beliefs make people less supportive of redistribution (Alesina, Stantcheva and Teso, 2017). However, this does not necessarily…

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Chaos at Port Isabel: Kids Held Overnight and Parents in Limbo

United States (TexasTribune) – Editor’s note: This story contains language that may be offensive to some readers. In a chaotic bid to reunite separated migrant families by Thursday’s court-imposed deadline, an adult-only detention center in deep South Texas wound up keeping children overnight and later held their parents in a bureaucratic limbo where they were denied access to phone calls and medical care, sources and advocates told The Texas Tribune. The Port Isabel Service Processing Center, designated a primary “reunification and removal” site, also went on lockdown for several hours Sunday…

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