Schools Are Wasting Student Time on Assignments Beneath Their Abilities

United States (ITO) – To look at international exams and results from various tests, one would think that America’s children are dimwits. Only a quarter of high school seniors are proficient in math. Thirty-seven percent of them are proficient in reading. And in science, only 22 percent make the grade. But while these stats make our children look somewhat dense, new research suggests that they are likely not the problem. In fact, they are more than up to the challenge to do great things academically… they just don’t get the chance. According to a new…

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Warrior Women: Despite What Gamers Might Believe, the Ancient World Was Full of Female Fighters

World Wide (Conversation) – One of the great things about computer games is that anything is possible in the almost endless array of situations on offer, whether they are realistic or fantasy worlds. But it has been reported that gamers are boycotting Total War: Rome II on the grounds of historical accuracy after developers introduced women generals, apparently to please “feminists”. But while it’s true that the Romans would not have had female soldiers in their armies, they certainly encountered women in battle – and when they did it created…

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg Helped Shape the Modern Era of Women’s Rights – Before She Went on the Supreme Court

United States (Conversation) – As the debate about the treatment of women rages across the United States, one Supreme Court nominee arrived at her confirmation hearing widely acknowledged as a trailblazer in establishing women’s rights. When he nominated Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to the Supreme Court, President Bill Clinton compared her legal work on behalf of women to the epochal work of Thurgood Marshall on behalf of African-Americans. The comparison was entirely appropriate: As Marshall oversaw the legal strategy that culminated in Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 case…

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Sexism, Racism Drive Black Women to Run For Office in Both Brazil and US

(Conversation) – Motivated in part by President Donald Trump’s disparaging remarks about women and the numerous claims that he committed sexual assault, American women are running for state and national office in historic numbers. At least 255 women are on the ballot as major party congressional candidates in the November general election. The surge includes a record number of women of color, many of whom say their candidacies reflect a personal concern about America’s increasingly hostile, even violent, racial dynamics. In addition to the 59 black female congressional candidates, Georgia’s…

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New Satellite Imagery Shows Growth in Detention Camps for Children

United States (HRW) – A satellite image taken on September 13, 2018, shows substantial growth in the tent city the US government is using to detain migrant children located in the desert in Tornillo, Texas. Image source Human Rights Watch The tent city was originally used to house children separated from parents this summer, when the Trump administration was aggressively prosecuting parents traveling with children for illegal entry to the US. The US Department of Health and Human Services has stated that the new growth in the number of tents is necessary in order to…

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7 Palestinians, Including 2 Children, Slain in Great Return Marches by Israeli Forces

Palestine (GPA) – Thousands of protesters in Gaza marched towards the Gazan border Friday, under the theme of “Al-Aqsa Friday.” Yesterday marked the 27th week of protests since the Great Return March demonstrations began six months ago on March 30. Israeli Occupying Forces (IOF) killed seven Palestinians and injured at least 520 more by firing live ammunition and rubber-coated bullets at the protestors. Among those killed included Iyad Khalil Shaer, Mohammad Ali Inshasi, and Mohammad Ali Inshasi — all 18 years old — as well as Mohammad Walid Haniya and Mohammad…

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Things Have Changed Since Anita Hill – Sort Of

United States (Conversation) – In 1991, Anita Hill accused Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment. Thomas was nonetheless confirmed. Now, as Brett Kavanaugh faces an allegation of sexual assault, observers are saying that “things have changed since Anita Hill.” Have they? As a scholar who studies gender dynamics in organizations, I believe the question of whether the #MeToo, #TimesUp and related movements have ushered in significant change is intertwined with three other questions, for which there has been some research: Are sexual harassment and sexual assault still as…

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Kavanaugh Confirmation a Reminder: Accused Sexual Harassers Get Promoted Anyway

United States (Conversation) – One day after hearing emotional testimony from accuser Christine Blasey Ford, the Senate Judiciary Committee advanced Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to become a U.S. Supreme Court justice pending an FBI investigation. For millions of American women – both those who’ve survived assault and those who have experienced workplace harassment – seeing a man on the path to promotion despite allegations of harassment is jarring yet painfully familiar. Recent examples include former CBS Chair Les Moonves and Fox’s Bill O’Reilly, not to mention media mogul Harvey Weinstein. Sadly, this…

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Sexual Assault Among Adolescents: 6 Facts

United States (Conversation) – Christine Blasey Ford’s account of allegedly being sexually assaulted by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh when they were teenagers is provoking both informed and uninformed comment from politicians. Still more private conversations about the subject are happening in homes and offices around the country. There is a large body of social science research about what are called “peer sexual assaults” that is relevant to these discussions. We are experts on violence, including sex offenses against children and youth, and our research focuses on surveys to document…

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Thirty Years Later, Why ‘The Satanic Verses’ Remains So Controversial

World Wide (Conversation) – One of the most controversial books in recent literary history, Salman Rushdie’s “The Satanic Verses,” was published three decades ago this month and almost immediately set off angry demonstrations all over the world, some of them violent. A year later, in 1989, Iran’s supreme leader, the Ayatollah Khomeini, issued a fatwa, or religious ruling, ordering Muslims to kill the author. Born in India to a Muslim family, but by then a British citizen living in the U.K., Rushdie was forced to go into protective hiding for…

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