Women Have Been Written Out of Science History – Time to Put Them Back

World Wide (Conversation) – Can you name a female scientist from history? Chances are you are shouting out Marie Curie. The twice Nobel Prize-winning Curie and mathematician Ada Lovelace are two of the few women within Western science to receive lasting popular recognition. One reason women tend to be absent from narratives of science is because it’s not as easy to find female scientists on the public record. Even today, the numbers of women entering science remain below those of men, especially in certain disciplines. A-level figures show only 12%…

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What Does Eleanor Roosevelt Have to Do with Black Lives Matter?

United States (Inequality) – Eleanor Roosevelt famously said that human rights must begin in “small places, close to home.” To speak to people’s everyday experiences in these places, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights — drafted with her leadership — protects not only civil and political rights but also socioeconomic rights “indispensable” for human dignity. These include the rights to work and to just and favorable conditions of work; to education; and to housing, medical care, and social services necessary to ensure an adequate standard of living. During her lifetime, Roosevelt…

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Ahed and Malala: Why We Revere Some Young Female Activists and Not Others

World Wide (Conversation) – After Israeli forces shot her 15-year-old cousin in the head with a rubber bullet last December, Ahed Tamimi, a Palestinian girl from Nabi Saleh in the West Bank, stood up to the occupying Israeli forces and was arrested and charged for slapping a soldier. The story of the activist went viral. But what Ahed was fighting for was largely buried beneath sensationalized media representations of her. Her story is unlikely to circulate in the same elevated spaces granted to Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who survived…

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US Senators Submit Draft to Hold SA Crown Prince Responsible in Khashoggi Case

Washington, DC (Sputnik) – Six US Senators have introduced a bipartisan resolution seeking to hold Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman accountable for the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Senator Christopher Coons said in a press release on Thursday. “Senate Resolution… holds … Mohammed bin Salman accountable for contributing to the humanitarian crisis in Yemen, the blockade of Qatar, the jailing of political dissidents within Saudi Arabia, the use of force to intimidate rivals, and the abhorrent and unjustified killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi,” the release said. The resolution was introduced by Senators Coons, Lindsey Graham, Dianne Feinstein, Marco…

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Why We Should Pay Attention to the Power of Youth

North America (Conversation) – Youth turnout in the recent United States midterm elections was the highest it has been in 25 years. The midterms also saw the average age of congressional representatives go down by 10 years. Likewise, in the 2015 Canadian federal election, 58 per cent of newly eligible voters turned out to vote, an increase of almost 18 per cent over the 2011 election. There have been similar increases in voting among 18- to 24-year-olds in provincial elections. Dramatic wins in 2015 for the NDP in Alberta and…

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Interview with the Free Women’s Movement (TJA) in North Kurdistan

Kurdistan (OpenDemocracy) – After the Syrian Kurds’ fight for Kobane (a Kurdish city in northern Syria/Rojava) against ISIS in 2014-5, many across the world were suddenly made aware of the Kurdish women’s movement. What has not reached us, however, is a much wider context that enabled the Kurdish women-fighters to confidently take up arms to defend themselves and their people. The unprecedented accomplishments of the Kurdish women predated Kobane and the war in Syria. They are rooted in the evolution of Turkey’s Kurdish liberation movement, as it is represented by the Kurdistan…

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China: Release Workers, Student Activists

(HRW) – The Chinese government should immediately release workers and students arbitrarily detained or forcibly disappeared during a nationwide crackdown since mid-2018, Human Rights Watch said today. Those held include factory workers, labor activists, college students, trade union officials, and a lawyer. “It’s ironic that a self-proclaimed socialist government is cracking down on young Marxists,” said Yaqiu Wang, China researcher at Human Rights Watch. “The persecution of student labor activists only exposes the absurdity of the Chinese government’s claim to champion workers’ rights.” In July, police in Guangdong province detained…

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Groping, Grinding, Grabbing: New Research on Nightclubs Finds Men do it Often But Know it’s Wrong

Australia (Conversation) – We have conducted what we believe to be Australia’s first quantitative research on young people’s behaviour in nightclubs and the findings present a disturbing picture. The research suggests that behaviour is taking place at these clubs that would be criminal if non-consensual, and totally unacceptable at the very least. However, the behaviour is somehow tolerated – in some cases almost encouraged. Many young people think they are too conservative, and that the behaviours they witness must be normal and acceptable in a nightclub setting – so they…

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Indonesia Launches ‘Snitch’ App Targeting Religious Minorities

(HRW) – Following your own religious beliefs shouldn’t be a crime, but in Indonesia, new technologies are helping authorities identify and potentially prosecute religious minorities who follow “deviant teachings.” On November 22, Bakor Pakem, a body charged with religious oversight in the Indonesia Attorney General’s office, launched an app that allows mobile device users to report individuals suspected of “religious heresy.” The app, Smart Pakem, available in the Google Play store, is an extension of an official website and hotline service. They were all set up by Bakor Pakem ostensibly…

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Meet the Women’s Rights Activists Languishing Behind Bars in Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia (GV) – The October 2018 murder of Saudi Arabian journalist Jamal Khashoggi — who Turkish officials say was killed at the order of Crown Prince Bin Salman — has cast new light on the many human rights abuses that take place in the kingdom. International and regional human rights groups and activists are taking this new scrutiny as an opportunity to publicly demand the release of imprisoned human rights activists, including women’s rights defenders. At least ten women’s rights activists are currently in jail in Saudi Arabia in retaliation for…

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